Blue economy sectors

Tourism is one of the most important sectors for the Maltese economy contributing to approximately 15 % of the GDP. Tourists are visiting Malta for the island’s rich history and culture as well as aquatic activities. Lately, medical tourism has also become popular in Malta. In 2017, Malta had 2,273,837 visitors an increase of 15.7% compared to 2016. Malta can accommodate 51,254 tourists at any given time with an occupancy rate of around 80% in summer and 47% in the winter months. The average stay id 7-8 nights and the most popular time of the year is June to September. Most tourists are from the United Kingdom, followed by Italy, Germany and France. Malta also has a significant number of visits from Cruise liners (over 300/year).

Malta has 6 marine aquaculture operators, 5 tuna fattening farms and one closed-cycle seabream farm. The farms are spread over 9 different sites. The sector provides employed for 197 FTE as well as 767 indirect FTE. The annual production is 12,500 MT. The policy of the Government is to target 5MT of closed-cycle aquaculture annually, develop a hatchery and increase FTE (up to 1185).

Maritime transport has been a catalyst of economic development and prosperity throughout the history of the country. Malta has two mayor ports, the Port of Marsaxlokk and the Port of Valetta. More than 90% of all goods entering and leaving Malta go through these ports. The port of Marsaxlokk is the base of 70% of the county’s fishing fleet and is handling about 2.8 million Twenty-Foot Equivalent. The port of Valetta is a multi-purpose port equipped for a large number of maritime services such as cruise liner and cargo berths, bunkering facilities, ship building yards and storage facilities (Source: Malta Marittima).

Malta uses a total of 180,000 Tons per year of fossil fuel and produces 133,419 MWh of renewable energy of which 58MWh is wind energy, 125,054 solar energy and 8,307 MWh of biogas. For a large part of its fossil fuel it is dependent on Sicily. The Government strongly considers the exploration of blue renewable energy opportunities. The four main blue energy areas that are being focused upon for further study are: offshore wind farms, floating photovoltaic islands, tidal wave energy conversion and blue geothermal renewable energy (Source : Malta Marittima).

Short description

Short description

The Maltese islands have a rich and long history going back to 5900 BC. Malta went through a golden Neolithic period which can been seen by the mysterious temples on the island. In later times, the Phoenicians, Cathaginians and Romans all left traces on...

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Local Working group

Local Working group

The following partners are involved in the study of Malta: AquaBioTech Group (ABT) The following local stakeholders have declared their interest in participating in the local study of Malta in the frame of the Soclimpact project: Ministry for...

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